Changing tires on the truck, what equipment is needed

Changing tires on a truck is a relatively easy task as most cars are already equipped with a basic maintenance package. The owner’s manual also has instructions on the type of tools you need for your truck. To give you an idea, here is a list of the essential equipment you need.

A basic tire-changing kit should include:

  • A spare tire
  • A jack
  • A wheel lock
  • Alignment studs
  • Extension bars that lower the spare wheel

In addition to the above tools, many professional mechanics suggest car owners to carry the following:

  • A torch with spare batteries in case you are changing your tire at night
  • Hand wipes to keep hands dirt-free
  • Tire pressure gauge for checking the spare tire’s air pressure
  • Guards to prevent the car rolling
  • Reflective triangles so that other drivers can see you
  • A sheet of heavy plywood to provide a stable base for the jack

Jacks

Jacks are available in different varieties such as, scissor, floor, bottle, and even bumper jacks. The most popular types that mechanics use to lift the truck are scissor jacks, but the bottle type is more powerful.

Lug wrench

Before fitting the spare tire to the truck, you must remove the old rim and the flat tire. To accomplish this, you need to loosen the lug nuts using a lug wrench. This tool is a great mechanical advantage, but when it comes to selecting the most suitable one, you need to make sure the length of the handle is longer so that you can exert more force on the nut.

Pry bar and wheel bolts

The hub cap on the other end is easily removable using the pry bar. Most trucks use wheel bolts rather than studs as they stay on the hub and act as a mounting surface. By using your wheel bolts to screw into the hub, the punctured tire will come off easily. This will make the new wheel fitting much simpler as it means you have to manage the tire with a bolt through a rim hole.

Remember to apply enough pressure across the wheel in order to tighten the nuts. To do this on a four to six stud hub, you must tighten them in opposite pairs by moving the wrench from the left stud to the right stud until all the nuts are totally tight. As the truck is on the jack, you don’t want to use too much force at this point. The idea is to stop the wheels from coming off under the exert pressure.